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Curriculum Design

Storyboarding

Storyboarding is one of the tools which you will use in developing new courses or redesigning for revalidation. This is a great method of being able to visually represent a sequence of ideas or activities to develop your course or module and to map out your learning, teaching and assessment strategies. In a group setting, such as a course team, working on a storyboard gives you freedom to move elements around to ensure you have not overloaded any particular area or the flow and alignment of all the components long before any action is taken with regards to real-world change.

One of the other benefits of visual storyboarding before hand is the ability to detect problems which can sometimes go un-noticed in pages of textual documentation used in validation events.

Below is an example of how storyboarding can work courtesy of Gilly Salmon as part of the Carpe Diem Model, some of which we have reflected in our own Course Design Blueprint model.


Next, take a look at tools to support your storyboarding.

Tools to help you Storyboard

The video on the previous tab is a good example to show how this could work in a group face to face model, however there are tools which will allow you to do some basic storyboarding online collaboratively with colleagues. The tool we will look at below is called a Padlet and as a University of Suffolk staff member you have access to an institutional service (make sure you use your institutional email to login).

You can follow the steps below once you are logged in to your padlet to create a storyboard.